How to design a child's bedroom

Zoe Hewett Interiors Grey Nursery

Despite the trend for using grey in interiors in recent years, it may not be the most obvious choice for a children’s bedroom, and yet it can work. Children’s colourful toys and furniture really pop out against darker hues in an unexpectedly delightful way, but often we shy away from anything more interesting than off-white. It is wise to be wary of creating an over-stimulating environment, particularly when sleep habits during early-years are less than desirable, but there is definitely a case for using rich, deep colours. They are ideal for creating cosseting, cosy spaces. It may seem counter-intuitive to use such a dark grey in a child’s room, but it is anything but depressing when livened up with it’s natural colour-partner, yellow, along with a zingy blue and purple. The dark walls, ceiling and blackout-lined curtains here aid daytime napping, and also make for a fantastic sensory room when all the colour changing lights are switched on. Using pattern only sparingly, this room aims not to be too bedazzling, and pointedly avoids any cartoon characters on the furnishings. Decorating can be disruptive, and no one wants to be making big or expensive changes every time a growing child acquires a new passion. Parents are also allowed to enjoy the surroundings too, so there is no harm in choosing paints and papers that can be pleasurable for everyone to look at, and will grow with the child to some extent. Choosing a gender neutral colour scheme is also a good idea, as you never know, there might be a new sibling to share the same space later on.

Zoe Hewett Interiors Nursery Bed

Aside from colour, there are plenty of practical points to consider in order to create a successful children’s bedroom scheme. Although a futon atop a Japanese tatami mat for the bed means the room is missing out on an obvious storage opportunity, it suits the inhabitant of this space who has difficulty climbing and is prone to falling out of bed. Ordinarily though, cabin, bunk and trundle drawer beds are perfect for double-duty sleeping and storage, especially in smaller spaces.

Storage for toys and clothes is obviously essential. It can be useful to have shelving options high up out of reach, to house things that require adult supervision, such as paints and felt tips, keeping the lower, accessible shelves for less troublesome items. Anything that encourages easy tidying is a good idea, and in this instance there are simple trugg buckets, the contents of which will no doubt change every so often, in line with the evolving interests of the occupant. Wardrobe units can often be imposing so here they have been painted the same colour as the walls, and even look at first glance as though they have been built in to the alcove, keeping the ‘visual noise’ down. The household bedlinen and towels are also stowed here, making excellent use of the storage facility which would otherwise be overkill for most small people’s clothing collections.

Zoe Hewett Interiors Nursery Gallery

Customising furniture, whether an old vintage gem or new from Ikea, is always a lovely way to add a unique touch to any room. This interior is home to a few upcycled items including a chest of drawers given new handles and a vibrant lick of paint using leftovers from previous furniture projects, home-made upcycled headboards (using a duvet and leftover curtain fabric) to soften the bed corner, and a giant old picture frame covered in fabric scraps. Little ones are never too young to make or appreciate art, so the gallery wall is a combination of family photos, keepsakes and old charity shop finds, and is easy to change up by swapping kids’ art or postcards from grandparents in to the frames.